LP Stitch: Bitches Brew

For January’s LP Stitch project, I created a reproduction of Miles Davis’ Bitches Brew (1970), considered to be one of the pioneering albums in jazz fusion. While this marks my return to album covers (after last month’s Darger reproduction), next month promises to be something radically different…

At some point soon, I plan to read the new 33 1/3 volume about Bitches Brew and have more to say about the album itself. For now, I want to set up a theme that will work its way through multiple blog posts this month. I just finished reading Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die (2007) by Chip and Dan Heath. Since then, I’ve been thinking about how to convert my dissertation findings into a single, “sticky” (i.e. memorable) idea.

The “sticky” version of my dissertation thesis is this: Jazz education has continually focused too much on comparative authenticity (assessing how musicians rate in comparison to each other – often reinforcing social hierarchies such as gender and race) at the expense of characteristic authenticity (valuing the traits, strengths, limitations, and idiosyncrasies that make each musician unique). To me, Miles Davis – with his subdued playing style, constant move away from the mainstream of jazz, and willingness to experiment with popular music – exemplified characteristic  authenticity.

 

Author: Leah Pogwizd

Bassist, Instructor, Writer

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s